A Living Fence for Wildlife

Bhaktivedanta Manor’s access road was planned as part of the scheme that would plant a double hedge row and plant trees every 15 metres.  The bank that the hedge sits on was the spoil that was moved to make way for the road.

As the hedge is now established it is now being lain in a traditional fashion. In England there are many different styles of hedge laying and HRH Prince Charles is President of the National Hedge laying Society.

There is a style unique to Hertfordshire and the Manor have assigned the local Hedge laying Champion Donato Cinicolo for the job.

The hedge is cut near its base and pulled over in one direction. There is a small section of trunk that remains connected to the base. The branches are laid at about 30 degrees for the sap to flow upwards and overall this will create a labyrinth of branches and shoots.

There are also stakes placed along the hedge line with supple branches twisted along the top to form a neat finish as well as a structure to keep the hedge in place. A basket weave effect is produced which makes the hedge strong and thick, making it ideal to attract wildlife: in essence it is a form of living fence.

Published onFriday, March 9th, 2012

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